High School Spelling Words

Spelling words for grade 9, 10, 11, and 12; 8 lists for each grade; vocabulary, online spelling exercise, thousands of printable quizzes and cards.
Grade 11: Word List - List 1

abash
read  v. embarrass; make ashamed or uneasy; disconcert
The titter that rippled around the room appeared to abash the boy, but in reality that result was caused rather more by his worshipful awe of his unknown idol and the dread pleasure that lay in his high good fortune.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
Louisa stood looking at the pretty modest head, as it drooped abashed before her, until it was raised again to glance at her face.
Hard Times - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
abate
read  v. subside; decrease; become less in amount or intensity
She knew I did; for the stateliness of her manner already abated towards me, except when she spoke in praise of him, and then her air was always lofty.
David Copperfield - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
He walked up one street, and down another, until exercise had abated the first passion of his grief; and then the revulsion of feeling made him thirsty.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 37
By Charles Dickens Context
The scarlet of her lips had not had time to abate, and just now it appeared still more intense by the absence of the neighbouring and more transient colour of her cheek.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
abdicate
read  v. give up, renounce, abandon, lay down, or withdraw from, as a right or claim
abject
read  a. being of the most miserable kind; wretched; lacking pride; brought low in condition or status
In this progress I was much annoyed by the abject Pumblechook, who, being behind me, persisted all the way as a delicate attention in arranging my streaming hatband, and smoothing my cloak.
Great Expectations - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
Yeobright had well considered all that, and she only thought how best to make her visit appear to Eustacia not abject but wise.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
abnegate
read  v. give up or surrender; deny something to oneself
abortive
read  a. unsuccessful; failing to accomplish an intended objective; fruitless
abridge
read  v. condense; shorten; reduce length of written text
absolve
read  v. let off hook; relieve of requirement or obligation
But, I believe the time has come when it would be mistaken faith and delicacy to conceal it any longer, and when your appeal absolves me from his injunction.
David Copperfield - Chapter 45
By Charles Dickens Context
She read me what she had written; and it was direct and clear, and evidently intended to absolve me from any suspicion of profiting by the receipt of the money.
Great Expectations - Chapter 49
By Charles Dickens Context
abstruse
read  a. obscure; profound; difficult to understand.
But I had no inclination for the law, even in this less abstruse study of it, which my family approved.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
abysmal
read  a. bottomless; very profound; limitless; very bad
accolade
read  n. award of merit; expression of approval; praise
accost
read  v. approach and speak to boldly or aggressively, as with demand or request
When we accosted him, his manner was something more confused, and something less genteel, than of yore.
David Copperfield - Chapter 49
By Charles Dickens Context
So, he spelt the bill through again, from beginning to end; and then, touching his fur cap in token of humility, accosted the gentleman in the white waistcoat.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 3
By Charles Dickens Context
acquiesce
read  v. assent; agree without protesting
Cathy was a powerful ally at home; and between them they at length persuaded my master to acquiesce in their having a ride or a walk together about once a week, under my guardianship, and on the moors nearest the Grange: for June found him still declining.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 25
By Emily Bronte Context
acrimonious
read  a. bitter and sharp in language, tone, or manner
acumen
read  n. mental keenness; quickness of perception
His very intensity and acumen in the affairs of the pits seemed like a manifestation of madness to her, his very inspirations were the inspirations of insanity.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 15
By D H Lawrence Context
adherent
read  n. person who adheres; one who follows or upholds a leader, party, cause
He gathered quite a following of lads interested in the exhibition; and one that had cut his finger and had been a centre of fascination and homage up to this time, now found himself suddenly without an adherent, and shorn of his glory.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
admonish
read  v. warn; counsel someone against something to be avoided
It was with a singular jumble of sadness and pleasure that I used to linger about my native place, until the reddening winter sun admonished me that it was time to start on my returning walk.
David Copperfield - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
adulation
read  n. excessive flattery or admiration; unmerited praise
aesthetic
read  a. elegant or tasteful; of or concerning appreciation of beauty or good taste
A man who advocates aesthetic effort and deprecates social effort is only likely to be understood by a class to which social effort has become a stale matter.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
affinity
read  n. natural attraction, liking, or feeling of kinship; relationship by marriage
Yeobright had shown him that grim friendliness which at last arises in all such cases of undesired affinity.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
affluent
read  a. having an abundant supply of money or possessions of value
I had the happiness to know you in former times, and the Drama has ever had a claim which has ever been acknowledged, on the noble and the affluent.
Great Expectations - Chapter 31
By Charles Dickens Context
aggregate
read  v. gather into a mass, sum, or whole; amount to
agnostic
read  n. one who is skeptical of existence of a god or any ultimate reality
alacrity
read  n. cheerful promptness or willingness; eagerness; speed or quickness
Some of the boys about me put in their claim not to be forgotten in the distribution of the good things, as I got out of my seat with great alacrity.
David Copperfield - Chapter 9
By Charles Dickens Context
The girl jumped up, with great alacrity; poured it quickly out, but with her back towards him; and held the vessel to his lips, while he drank off the contents.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
There could be only the most proper alacrity, a most obliging compliance for public view; and smiles reined in and spirits dancing in private rapture.
Persuasion - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
alleviate
read  v. provide physical relief, as from pain; make easier; remove in part
My depression was not alleviated by the announcement, for, I had supposed that establishment to be an hotel kept by Mr. Barnard, to which the Blue Boar in our town was a mere public-house.
Great Expectations - Chapter 21
By Charles Dickens Context
ambience
read  n. particular environment or surrounding influence; atmosphere of environment
ameliorate
read  v. make or become better; improve; grow better
amenity
read  n. pleasantness resulting from agreeable conditions
amiable
read  a. good-natured and likable; lovable; warmly friendly
Micawber was, down to the very last moment of the evening, when I took a hearty farewell of himself and his amiable wife.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
Yet it was remarkable that she sat as still as ever the amiable woman in ambuscade had seen her sit, at any period in her life.
Hard Times - Chapter 21
By Charles Dickens Context
antithesis
read  n. contrast; direct contrast; opposition
aphorism
read  n. definition or concise statement of principle; tersely phrased statement of truth or opinion
ardent
read  a. displaying or by strong enthusiasm or devotion; passionate
After some rest and change, I fell to work, in my old ardent way, on a new fancy, which took strong possession of me.
David Copperfield - Chapter 58
By Charles Dickens Context
He recalled her memory with ardent, tender love, and hopeful aspiring to the better world; where he doubted not she was gone.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
auspicious
read  a. attended by favorable circumstances; marked by success; prosperous
There was an improving party assembled on the auspicious occasion, who knew what everything they had to eat and drink was made of, and how it was imported or exported, and in what quantities, and in what bottoms, whether native or foreign, and all about it.
Hard Times - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
avow
read  v. declare openly; acknowledge openly, boldly, and unashamedly
My avowed one, or what I avowed to myself, was to see whether your sister were still partial to Bingley, and if she were, to make the confession to him which I have since made.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 60
By Jane Austen Context
awry
read  ad. in a position that is turned toward one side; away from correct course
A cold supper was ready upon the table, and when his needs were satisfied and his pipe alight he was ready to take that half comic and wholly philosophic view which was natural to him when his affairs were going awry.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context