6th Grade Spelling Words

Organized as 8 lists, each list has pages for vocabulary, online spelling card, and printable worksheet. Vocabulary page not only hosts explanations and examples, but also includes spelling, testing, and other online study tools.
Grade 6: Vocabulary - List 4

estimatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. judge to be probable; form an opinion about; evaluate
They tried to estimate how long they had been in the cave, but all they knew was that it seemed days and weeks, and yet it was plain that this could not be, for their candles were not gone yet.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 31
By Mark Twain Context
I have not had so many opportunities of estimating the minuter propensities of his mind, his inclinations and tastes, as you have; but I have the highest opinion in the world of his goodness and sense.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 4
By Jane Austen Context
eternalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. forever; being without beginning or end; existing outside of time; infinite
My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
It seemed a sort of last man among them, musing for a moment before dropping into eternal night with the rest of his race.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
I came into the valley, as the evening sun was shining on the remote heights of snow, that closed it in, like eternal clouds.
David Copperfield - Chapter 58
By Charles Dickens Context
excludespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. leave out of; keep out of; reject
Heathcliff shunned meeting us at meals; yet he would not consent formally to exclude Hareton and Cathy.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 34
By Emily Bronte Context
From that room, too, the daylight was completely excluded, and it had an airless smell that was oppressive.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
I exclude extremes, of course; and a very close resemblance in all those points would be the likeliest way to produce an extreme.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 35
By Jane Austen Context
expansespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. patch; wide and open extent, as of surface, land, or sky
They shot higher and higher and widened rapidly into a broad expanse of red before her terrified eyes.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 23
By Margaret Mitche Context
Others, again, while this was in progress, lifted their eyes and swept the vast expanse of country commanded by their position, now lying nearly obliterated by shade.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
Mary felt as if the drive would never come to an end and that the wide, bleak moor was a wide expanse of black ocean through which she was passing on a strip of dry land.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 3
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
expeditionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. journey organized for a particular purpose
This frightened Oliver very much, and made him glad to get out of those villages with all possible expedition.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
They lay around in the shade, after breakfast, while Huck had a smoke, and then went off through the woods on an exploring expedition.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 14
By Mark Twain Context
The heat of the day had scarcely declined as yet, and she went along the sunny hills at a leisurely pace, there being ample time for her idle expedition.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
extendspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. open or straighten something out; unbend; prolong
Having unloosened the cravat of the man who still remained extended on the ground, she tottered towards the undertaker.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
His voice was as smooth and suave as his countenance, as he advanced with a plump little hand extended, murmuring his regret for having missed us at his first visit.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If my family are at length sensible of the deprivation to which their own conduct has, in the past, exposed them, and now desire to extend the hand of fellowship, let it not be repulsed.
David Copperfield - Chapter 57
By Charles Dickens Context
exterminatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. eliminate; eradicate; kill on a large scale; kill man
extremespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. outermost; utmost; farthest; most remote; at the widest limit
On the extreme verge of the horizon lie a long chain of mountain peaks, with their rugged summits flecked with snow.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
So he took a chop by the bone in one hand, and a potato in the other, and ate away with a very good appetite, to my extreme satisfaction.
David Copperfield - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
I understand that this gentleman, your friend, is a man of honour and discretion, whom I may trust with a matter of the most extreme importance.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
factorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. anything that contributes causally to a result; element; variable
But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
farespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. food and drink; diet; transportation charge; a paying passenger
There was no sign or trace of his passenger, and I fear it will be some time before he gets his fare.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
There were apples, yams, peanuts and milk on the table at Tara but never enough of even this primitive fare.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 25
By Margaret Mitche Context
If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before set down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there, and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 47
By Jane Austen Context
fascinatingspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. capable of arousing and holding the attention
These details and accompanying delays worked up an atmosphere of preparation that was as impressive as it was fascinating.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 23
By Mark Twain Context
We have in our police reports realism pushed to its extreme limits, and yet the result is, it must be confessed, neither fascinating nor artistic.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
She had the most delightful little voice, the gayest little laugh, the pleasantest and most fascinating little ways, that ever led a lost youth into hopeless slavery.
David Copperfield - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
fatalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. causing death; leading to failure or disaster
That would be fatal, as only old men and very old ladies could belch without fear of social disapproval.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
We had sprung to our feet, and for a few moments we stared in silent amazement at this ponderous piece of wreckage, which told of some sudden and fatal storm far out on the ocean of life.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
fatiguespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. physical or mental weariness; exhaustion
There were harsh lines of fatigue and urgency in his face but his tattered gray hat was off with a sweep.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 21
By Margaret Mitche Context
Whatever be his pursuits, his eagerness in them should know no moderation, and leave him no sense of fatigue.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 9
By Jane Austen Context
Poor Oliver tried to keep up with the coach a little way, but was unable to do it, by reason of his fatigue and sore feet.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
featspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an achievement that requires great courage, skill, or strength; accomplishment
Crupp consented to achieve this feat, on condition that I dined from home for a fortnight afterwards.
David Copperfield - Chapter 28
By Charles Dickens Context
It was the greatest feat of the war, and Atlanta took pride and personal satisfaction in the thought that its railroads had made the victory possible.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
It was not then, but when we had got to the cheese, that our conversation turned upon our rowing feats, and that Drummle was rallied for coming up behind of a night in that slow amphibious way of his.
Great Expectations - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
feeblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. lacking vigor, force, or effectiveness; faint; frail
She gave some feeble signs of returning animation when they entered, and presently the faint transparency was presented in a sitting attitude.
Hard Times - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
At this point of the inquiry, Oliver raised his head; and, looking round with imploring eyes, murmured a feeble prayer for a draught of water.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
He cried, he pleaded for forgiveness, promised to reform over and over again, and then received his dismissal, feeling that he had won but an imperfect forgiveness and established but a feeble confidence.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 10
By Mark Twain Context
ferryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. shuttle; transport by boat or aircraft
I stayed to dine at a decent alehouse, some mile or two from the Ferry I have mentioned before; and thus the day wore away, and it was evening when I reached it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 31
By Charles Dickens Context
Every little while he locked me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry, and traded fish and game for whisky, and fetched it home and got drunk and had a good time, and licked me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
fertilizerspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any substance used to make soil more fertile
festivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. offering fun and gaiety; joyous; celebratory
On the present festive occasion he emerged from his room, when the blithe bells were going, the picture of misery, in a full suit of Sunday penitentials.
Great Expectations - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
There remained varicolored cotton dresses which Scarlett felt were not festive enough for the occasion, ball dresses and the green sprigged muslin she had worn yesterday.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
fiberspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. slender, elongated, threadlike object or structure; material to make paper or cloth
financespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. management of money and credit and banking and investments; subsidizing; fund
All you ever do is finance Carpetbaggers in their thieving and take half the profits and bribe Yankee officials to let you in on schemes to rob us taxpayers.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 43
By Margaret Mitche Context
So alarming did the state of my finances become, that I soon realized that I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country, or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
flammablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. easily ignited and capable of burning rapidly; inflammable
flexiblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. pliant; elastic; capable of being bent or flexed; pliable
focusspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. most important thing; a fixed reference point; center of interest or activity
Then I did the same for Herbert (who modestly said he had not my administrative genius), and felt that I had brought his affairs into a focus for him.
Great Expectations - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
At present I am, as you know, fairly busy, but I propose to devote my declining years to the composition of a textbook, which shall focus the whole art of detection into one volume.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
foulspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act that violates of the rules of a sport
It indicates a spontaneous, Promethean rebelliousness against that fiat that this recurrent season shall bring foul times, cold darkness, misery and death.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
His pride, in that direction, may be of service, if not to himself, to many others, for it must only deter him from such foul misconduct as I have suffered by.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 41
By Jane Austen Context
Their convict uniforms were dirty and foul with sweat, shackles clanked between their ankles when they moved tiredly, and there was an air of apathy and despair about them.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 44
By Margaret Mitche Context
foundationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. basis on which something is grounded
Clym reached the hatches, the framework of which was shaken to its foundations by the velocity of the current.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
I was angry at that false report, until, finding myself on my back in the passage, I began to think there might be some foundation for it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 24
By Charles Dickens Context
Finally there came a night when the gale was so violent that the farm buildings rocked on their foundations and several tiles were blown off the roof of the barn.
Animal Farm - Chapter 6
By George Orwell Context
fragrantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having a pleasant or sweet smell; odorous
She could look back, unmoved, at the pretty Scarlett with her fragile green morocco slippers and her flounces fragrant with lavender but she wondered if she could be that same girl.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 29
By Margaret Mitche Context
frailspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. physically weak; easily broken
Perhaps this and her healthy enjoyment of walking and riding had turned him from her to the frail Melanie.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
The walls of his chest seemed to thrill and quiver as a frail building would do inside when some powerful engine was at work.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The nocturnal visitor was a young man, frail and thin, with a black moustache, which intensified the deadly pallor of his face.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
functionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act of executing or performing any duty; assigned duty or activity
Even in their extremity, they had not considered asking a widow of scarcely a year to appear at a social function.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
Such was her intentness, however, that it seemed as if her ears were performing the functions of seeing as well as hearing.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
The principal function of this retainer was to quarrel with the cook; in which respect he was a perfect Whittington, without his cat, or the remotest chance of being made Lord Mayor.
David Copperfield - Chapter 48
By Charles Dickens Context
fusespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. combine; blend; become plastic or fluid or liquefied from heat
In this atmosphere, as nerve straining as watching a slow fuse burn toward a barrel of gunpowder, Scarlett came rapidly back to strength.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 42
By Margaret Mitche Context
fussspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. angry disturbance; excited state of agitation; needlessly nervous or useless activity; protest; quarrel
gallantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. courtly; lively and spirited; having or displaying great dignity or nobility
My child, Sherman has twice as many men as Johnston, and he can afford to lose two men for every one of our gallant laddies.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 17
By Margaret Mitche Context
Without considering, perhaps, whether there were any consequences to be taken, I felt quite in a glow at this gallant speech.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
As she sat down, her eyes once again encountered those of the gallant beadle; she coloured, and applied herself to the task of making his tea.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
garmentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any article of clothing, as coat or gown
At the head of the column there rode a score or more of grave ironfaced men, clad in sombre homespun garments and armed with rifles.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He put his hand on his jacket pocket, found his piece of bark safe, and then struck through the woods, following the shore, with streaming garments.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 15
By Mark Twain Context
Rhett had brought her that linen and lace from Nassau on the last boat he slipped through the blockade and she had worked a week to make the garment.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 24
By Margaret Mitche Context
generosityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. noble birth; quality of being noble; noble-mindedness; liberality in giving
They continued to behave very much as before, and when treated with generosity, simply took advantage of it.
Animal Farm - Chapter 3
By George Orwell Context
I am sure I can never feel thankful enough for the generosity with which he has protected me, so much younger and lower in the school than himself.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
She was remembering the vital, virile old man with his mane of crisp white hair, his bellowing cheerfulness, his stamping boots, his clumsy jokes, his generosity.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 39
By Margaret Mitche Context
genuinespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. authentic; sincerely and honestly felt or experienced; real or true
It was a genuine relief to the whole congregation when the ordeal was over and the benediction pronounced.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 5
By Mark Twain Context
Her features were handsome; but their natural play was so locked up, that it seemed impossible to guess at their genuine expression.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
Then she could gradually rise up to the genuine satisfaction of having a partner, a voluntary partner, secured against the dancing began.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 28
By Jane Austen Context
glamourspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. air of compelling charm, romance, and excitement, especially when delusively alluring; magic spell
It was quite true, men had no real glamour for a woman: if you could fool yourself into thinking they had, even as she had fooled herself over Michaelis, that was the best you could do.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 6
By D H Lawrence Context
Yet when I think of him in cold blood, far away from the glamour of his presence, I am convinced from his cynical speech and the look which I have caught in his eyes that he is one who should be deeply distrusted.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
glarespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. light; brightness; fierce or angry stare
The speaker was a woman, gazing down upon the group from an upper window, whose panes blazed in the ruddy glare from the west.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
In front of him, in the full glare of the electric light, there stood a tall, slim, dark woman, a veil over her face, a mantle drawn round her chin.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It was a pleasant land of white houses, peaceful plowed fields and sluggish yellow rivers, but a land of contrasts, of brightest sun glare and densest shade.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
gradualspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. proceeding by steps or degrees; advancing, step by step, as in ascent or descent or from one state to another; regularly progressive
As the weeks went by, my interest in him and my curiosity as to his aims in life, gradually deepened and increased.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Gradually the cool dim gray of the morning whitened, and as gradually sounds multiplied and life manifested itself.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 14
By Mark Twain Context
At last, as midnight approached and the street gradually cleared, he paced up and down the room in uncontrollable agitation.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
graspspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. grip; take hold of or seize firmly with or as if with the hand
The candle was relit, and there was our wretched captive, shivering and cowering in the grasp of the detective.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The grasp of his hand relaxed; the upraised arm fell languidly by his side; and he lay like one in a profound trance.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
I seem to be in the grasp of some resistless, inexorable evil, which no foresight and no precautions can guard against.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
grudgespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be unwilling or reluctant to give or admit; be envious; show discontent
After that, Melanie noticed there was more food on the table when guests were present, even though Scarlett might grudge them every mouthful.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 30
By Margaret Mitche Context
You may possibly remember that you chaffed me a little, some hours ago, when the sun seemed on your side of the hedge, so you must not grudge me a little pomp and ceremony now.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Every mouthful of food was an acute positive pleasure, now that it was truly their own food, produced by themselves and for themselves, not doled out to them by a grudging master.
Animal Farm - Chapter 3
By George Orwell Context
grumblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. utter or emit low dull rumbling sounds
He said it in his grumbling voice, and then quite suddenly he seemed to get angry with her, though she did not see why he should.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 10
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Fortifying himself with this assurance, Sikes drained the glass to the bottom, and then, with many grumbling oaths, called for his physic.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
Nobody stole, nobody grumbled over his rations, the quarrelling and biting and jealousy which had been normal features of life in the old days had almost disappeared.
Animal Farm - Chapter 3
By George Orwell Context
hangarspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. shelter especially for housing or repairing aircraft
hastespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. hurry; rapidity of action or motion
Captain Wentworth was folding up a letter in great haste, and either could not or would not answer fully.
Persuasion - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
I uttered an expression of disgust, and pushed past him into the yard, running against Earnshaw in my haste.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
It was as if I had seen her admiringly and tenderly embracing Dora, and tacitly reproving me, by her considerate protection, for my hot haste in fluttering that little heart.
David Copperfield - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
hatchspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. breed; emerge from the egg
The older, quieter cities were wont to look upon the bustling new town with the sensations of a hen which has hatched a duckling.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
It appeared to me that the eggs from which young Insurers were hatched were incubated in dust and heat, like the eggs of ostriches, judging from the places to which those incipient giants repaired on a Monday morning.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
A stump of hay and part of the potato crop were sold off, and the contract for eggs was increased to six hundred a week, so that that year the hens barely hatched enough chicks to keep their numbers at the same level.
Animal Farm - Chapter 9
By George Orwell Context
havenspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. refuge; shelter; harbor or anchorage; port
THIS is not the place to commemorate the trials and privations endured by the immigrant Mormons before they came to their final haven.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Some, like Ellen, were members of old families who had found life intolerable in their former homes and sought haven in a distant land.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
hazardousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. dangerous; reckless; daring; inclined to run risks
He had sold his boats when blockading grew too hazardous, and he was now openly engaged in food speculation.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
hazyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. slightly obscure; unclear, confused, or uncertain
His talk of shadow shows and hazy outlines conveyed no meaning to her but his last words were in language she could understand.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 31
By Margaret Mitche Context
The solitary window was so dirty that the light was hazy and uncertain, giving a dull grey tinge to everything, which was intensified by the thick layer of dust which coated the whole apartment.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I shall call hills steep, which ought to be bold; surfaces strange and uncouth, which ought to be irregular and rugged; and distant objects out of sight, which ought only to be indistinct through the soft medium of a hazy atmosphere.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
hecticspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. feverish; very busy with activity and confusion; habitual; marking particular habit or condition of body
hordespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a large group or crowd; wandering troop or gang; a moving crowd
hospitalityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act or practice of one who is hospitable; reception and entertainment of strangers or guests without reward
The house was large and handsome; and the Middletons lived in a style of equal hospitality and elegance.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
The old portraits on the walls had been dignified and gracious and had looked down upon guests with an air of mellowed hospitality.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 35
By Margaret Mitche Context
It has often led him to be liberal and generous, to give his money freely, to display hospitality, to assist his tenants, and relieve the poor.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 16
By Jane Austen Context
hostagespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. prisoner who is held by one party to insure that another party will meet specified terms