7th Grade Spelling Words

Organized as 8 lists, each list has pages for vocabulary, online spelling card, and printable worksheet. Vocabulary page not only hosts explanations and examples, but also includes spelling, testing, and other online study tools.
Grade 7: Vocabulary - List 2

bestowspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. give as gift; present
So much the greater must have been the solitude of her heart, and her need of some one on whom to bestow it.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
There were songs, speeches, and more firing of the gun, and a special gift of an apple was bestowed on every animal, with two ounces of corn for each bird and three biscuits for each dog.
Animal Farm - Chapter 8
By George Orwell Context
The young gentleman did not stop to bestow any other mark of recognition upon Oliver than a humourous grin; but, turning away, beckoned the visitors to follow him down a flight of stairs.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
biennialspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. every two years; lasting or living for two years
bizarrespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. fantastic; violently contrasting; strangely unconventional in style or appearance
So, indeed, it proved, and as I come to the dark conclusion of a story which had seemed to me to be only childish and bizarre, I experience once again the dismay and horror with which I was filled.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Amid the action and reaction of so dense a swarm of humanity, every possible combination of events may be expected to take place, and many a little problem will be presented which may be striking and bizarre without being criminal.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
bogglespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. hesitate as if in fear or doubt; shy away or be overcome with fright or astonishment
borespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. drill; make a hole in or through, with or as if with a drill
The benches was made out of outside slabs of logs, with holes bored in the round side to drive sticks into for legs.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 20
By Mark Twain Context
When the prosecution opened and the evidence was put short, aforehand, I noticed how heavy it all bore on me, and how light on him.
Great Expectations - Chapter 42
By Charles Dickens Context
I fear that I bore you with these details, but I have to let you see my little difficulties, if you are to understand the situation.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
breadthspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. measure or dimension from side to side; width; extent
So tall was he that his hat actually brushed the cross bar of the doorway, and his breadth seemed to span it across from side to side.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The present Catherine has no other likeness to her, except a breadth of forehead, and a certain arch of the nostril that makes her appear rather haughty, whether she will or not.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 33
By Emily Bronte Context
While we were still on our way to those detached apartments across the paved yard at the back, he asked me how often I had seen Miss Havisham eat and drink; offering me a breadth of choice, as usual, between a hundred times and once.
Great Expectations - Chapter 29
By Charles Dickens Context
brittlespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. easily broken; having little elasticity
Aunt Pauline and her husband, a little old man, with a formal, brittle courtesy and the absent air of one living in an older age, lived on a plantation on the river, far more isolated than Tara.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 7
By Margaret Mitche Context
burrowspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. tunnel; hole in the ground made by an animal for shelter; dig; move through by or as by digging
She was as hunted as a fox, running with a bursting heart, trying to reach a burrow before the hounds caught up.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 35
By Margaret Mitche Context
A door suddenly flew open out of what appeared to be solid wall at the end of the corridor, and a little, wizened man darted out of it, like a rabbit out of its burrow.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
businessspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. rightful concern or responsibility; occupation, work, or trade in which a person is engaged; commercial enterprise
I did wish Tom Sawyer was there; I knowed he would take an interest in this kind of business, and throw in the fancy touches.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 7
By Mark Twain Context
In other words, five pounds and Oliver Twist were offered to any man or woman who wanted an apprentice to any trade, business, or calling.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
This made such a very miserable piece of business of it, that I rolled myself up in a corner of the counterpane, and cried myself to sleep.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
caldronspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. large kettle or boiler of copper, brass, or iron
These tinctured the silent bosom of the clouds above them and lit up their ephemeral caves, which seemed thenceforth to become scalding caldrons.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
canaryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. pale yellowish color; wine made in the Canary Islands; canary bird; quick and lively dance
They were not unlike birds, altogether; having a sharp, brisk, sudden manner, and a little short, spruce way of adjusting themselves, like canaries.
David Copperfield - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
capitalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. wealth in form of money or property; assets available for use; city that is the official seat of government
My opinion of the coal trade on that river is, that it may require talent, but that it certainly requires capital.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
To the scientific student of the higher criminal world, no capital in Europe offered the advantages which London then possessed.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
For he would have to have some work, even hard work, to do, and he would have to make his own living, even if her capital started him.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 19
By D H Lawrence Context
careerspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. profession or occupation; individual’s work and life roles over their lifespan
I had little doubt that I had come to the end of my career when I perceived the somewhat sinister figure of the late Professor Moriarty standing upon the narrow pathway which led to safety.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He said he meant to look to it that Tom should be admitted to the National Military Academy and afterward trained in the best law school in the country, in order that he might be ready for either career or both.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 35
By Mark Twain Context
When we were nearly come to the last round of the punch, I addressed myself to Traddles, and reminded him that we must not separate, without wishing our friends health, happiness, and success in their new career.
David Copperfield - Chapter 36
By Charles Dickens Context
cataclysmspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; deluge or overflowing of water
The cataclysm has happened, we are among the ruins, we start to build up new little habitats, to have new little hopes.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
catastrophespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. calamity; disaster; state of extreme ruin and misfortune
This catastrophe I am inclined to regard as an unhappy accident, for I am convinced that the lady had no intention of inflicting so grievous an injury.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Venn soon felt himself relieved from further attendance, and went to the door, scarcely able yet to realize the strange catastrophe that had befallen the family in which he took so great an interest.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
I was superstitious about dreams then, and am still; and Catherine had an unusual gloom in her aspect, that made me dread something from which I might shape a prophecy, and foresee a fearful catastrophe.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
ceasespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. stop; terminate; put an end to; discontinue
By and by attention ceased from him, and the accustomed school murmur rose upon the dull air once more.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
Old Barley was growling and swearing when we repassed his door, with no appearance of having ceased or of meaning to cease.
Great Expectations - Chapter 46
By Charles Dickens Context
I read for about ten minutes, beginning in the heart of a chapter, and then suddenly, in the middle of a sentence, he ordered me to cease and to change my dress.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
chamberspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a private room, typically a bedroom; compartment; a large room used for formal or public events
Gradgrind did not take after Blue Beard, his room was quite a blue chamber in its abundance of blue books.
Hard Times - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
Within was a small chamber, chilly as an icehouse, and walled by Nature with solid limestone that was dewy with a cold sweat.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 29
By Mark Twain Context
My room was at the top of the house, at the back: a close chamber; stencilled all over with an ornament which my young imagination represented as a blue muffin; and very scantily furnished.
David Copperfield - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
chaoticspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. in utter disorder; lacking visible order or organization
chivalryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. knightly skill; courtesy towards women
It is a name of heroism and renown; of kings, princes, and knights; and seems to breathe the spirit of chivalry and warm affections.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
I do not think that the best embodiment of chivalry, the realization of the handsomest and most romantic figure ever imagined by painter, could have said this, with a more impressive and affecting dignity than the plain old Doctor did.
David Copperfield - Chapter 42
By Charles Dickens Context
chordspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. combination of three or more notes that blend harmoniously when sounded together
War and marriage and childbirth had passed over her without touching any deep chord within her and she was unchanged.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
Therefore, if it had depended upon me to touch the prevailing chord among them with any skill, I should have made a poor hand of it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 21
By Charles Dickens Context
circumferencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. boundary line of a circle, figure, area, or object
The loads were all laid together, and a pyramid of furze thirty feet in circumference now occupied the crown of the tumulus, which was known as Rainbarrow for many miles round.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
cliquespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. small exclusive group of friends or associates
clutchspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. grasp and hold tightly; attempt to grasp or seize
The other dived down the hole, and I heard the sound of rending cloth as Jones clutched at his skirts.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It seemed so still, like him, with a curious inward stillness that made her want to clutch it, as if she could not reach it.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 13
By D H Lawrence Context
I clutched the leg of the table again immediately, and pressed it to my bosom as if it had been the companion of my youth and friend of my soul.
Great Expectations - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
coaxspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. persuade or try to persuade by pleading or flattery; move to or adjust toward a desired end
Peggotty himself, whom she could have coaxed into anything, by only going and laying her cheek against his rough whisker.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
She had pretty, coaxing ways, as you might say, and I thought there was no harm in letting her just put her head through the door.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The little monkey had crept by the skylight of one garret, along the roof, into the skylight of the other, and it was with the utmost difficulty I could coax her out again.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 7
By Emily Bronte Context
columnspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. pillar; cylindrical or polygonal support for roof; anything resembling, in form or position; upright body or mass
No, no, no my friend; not to the top of the column; you know better than that; to the bottom, to the bottom.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
If I had come in here as a journalist, I should have interviewed myself and had two columns in every evening paper.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
At the head of the column there rode a score or more of grave ironfaced men, clad in sombre homespun garments and armed with rifles.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
commencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. have a beginning or origin; originate; start; begin
I have unusual business to transact with you, and I commence by explaining that it is not of my originating.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
I felt extremely flattered by this arrangement, and we commenced carrying it into execution that very evening.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
Now from this double point our research must commence, and we will begin it by presuming that what the lad says is absolutely true.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
communicatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. send information about; make known; impart; reveal clearly
Also, that if you accompany me now, it is understood that you communicate no more with any of your friends who are here present.
Hard Times - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
At present I am ready to promise that the instant that I can communicate with you without endangering my own combinations, I shall do so.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Word had gone round during the day that old Major, the prize Middle White boar, had had a strange dream on the previous night and wished to communicate it to the other animals.
Animal Farm - Chapter 1
By George Orwell Context
companionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one of a pair of things intended to complement or match each other; partner
He looked at his companion sneakingly, he looked at him admiringly, he looked at him boldly, and put up one leg on the sofa.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
Under these circumstances, I eagerly hailed the little mystery which hung around my companion, and spent much of my time in endeavouring to unravel it.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
compassionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. sensation of sorrow excited by the distress or misfortunes of another; pity; commiseration
Connie felt a sudden, strange leap of sympathy for him, a leap mingled with compassion, and tinged with repulsion, amounting almost to love.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 3
By D H Lawrence Context
And you may say, if you please, that I shall prepare my most plaintive airs against his return, in compassion to his feelings, as I know his horse will lose.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
compassionatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having a temper or disposition to pity; sympathetic; merciful
Her kind, compassionate visits to this old schoolfellow, sick and reduced, seemed to have quite delighted Mr Elliot.
Persuasion - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
I began to dislike, more than to compassionate Linton, and to excuse his father in some measure for holding him cheap.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 21
By Emily Bronte Context
Darcy, in wretched suspense, could only say something indistinctly of his concern, and observe her in compassionate silence.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 46
By Jane Austen Context
compelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. force; coerce; necessitate or pressure by force
Oliver told them all his simple history, and was often compelled to stop, by pain and want of strength.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 30
By Charles Dickens Context
They laid me on a couch, I motioned for air, they were compelled to open the window, and you had your chance.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Calvert had never known how to compel respect from negro servants and it was not to be expected that she could get it from a white man.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 29
By Margaret Mitche Context
concentratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. bring to or direct toward a common center; unite more closely; gather into one body
Again the avenger had been foiled, and again his concentrated hatred urged him to continue the pursuit.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He let her shave him nearly every day: her face near his, her eyes so very concentrated, watching that she did it right.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 9
By D H Lawrence Context
She had something of an estranged mien; the solitude exhaled from the heath was concentrated in this face that had risen from it.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
concernspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. interest in any person or thing; regard; solicitude; anxiety
Why it came natural to me to do so, and why Biddy had a deep concern in everything I told her, I did not know then, though I think I know now.
Great Expectations - Chapter 12
By Charles Dickens Context
How her temper and understanding might bear the investigation of his present keener time of life was another concern and rather a fearful one.
Persuasion - Chapter 15
By Jane Austen Context
Her violet eyes shining, her lips parted, a pink flush upon her cheeks, all thought of her natural reserve lost in her overpowering excitement and concern.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
condemnspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. blame; denounce; express strong disapproval of
The hotel where he was known to live when condemned to that region of blackness, was the stake to which he was tied.
Hard Times - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
Again, the dreaded Sunday comes round, and I file into the old pew first, like a guarded captive brought to a condemned service.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
Condemned to inaction and a state of constant restlessness and suspense, I rowed about in my boat, and waited, waited, waited, as I best could.
Great Expectations - Chapter 47
By Charles Dickens Context
confederatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. ally; form a group or unite
Soon Raphael Semmes and the Confederate Navy would tend to those Yankee gunboats and the ports would be wide open.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
There he was dogged by his confederate, who held Beppo responsible for the loss of the pearl, and he stabbed him in the scuffle which followed.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He has little time, for he has heard the scuffle downstairs when the wife tried to force her way up, and perhaps he has already heard from his Lascar confederate that the police are hurrying up the street.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
confirmspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. support or establish the certainty or validity of; verify
Steerforth himself confirmed this when it was stated, and said that he should like to begin to see him do it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 6
By Charles Dickens Context
You say you are an orphan, without a friend in the world; all the inquiries I have been able to make, confirm the statement.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
He was certainly better pleased to hand her into the barouche than to assist her in ascending the box, and his complacency seemed confirmed by the arrangement.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
confusespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cause to be unable to think with clarity or act with intelligence or understanding; mix up
With a confused brain, but with a heart into which some warmth of hope was returning, I accompanied my friend in a walk round the garden.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
This diverts suspicion and confuses it; and for the same reason I recommended that, even if you came back last night, you should not go home.
Great Expectations - Chapter 45
By Charles Dickens Context
There rose through the clear air a confused clattering and rumbling from this great mass of humanity, with the creaking of wheels and the neighing of horses.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
consensusspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. general agreement or accord; opinion reached by a group as a whole
consideratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. thoughtful; marked by consideration or reflection; deliberate
Steerforth was considerate, too; and showed his consideration, in one particular instance, in an unflinching manner that was a little tantalizing, I suspect, to poor Traddles and the rest.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
consolespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cheer from distress or depression; alleviate grief and raise spirits of; relieve; comfort
Also to tell you, that you had best seek that home of yours, with all speed, and hide your head among those excellent people who are expecting you, and whom your money will console.
David Copperfield - Chapter 50
By Charles Dickens Context
conspicuousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. noticeable; prominent; easy to notice; obvious
He would rather walk with me in the evening than in the daylight, for he said that he hated to be conspicuous.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Her extraordinary fixity, her conspicuous loneliness, her heedlessness of night, betokened among other things an utter absence of fear.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
He is a thoroughly bad character who would take advantage of your youth and innocence to make you conspicuous and publicly disgrace you and your family.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 10
By Margaret Mitche Context
constructspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. form by assembling or combining parts; build; create
It was claimed that same evening, and returned; but in the interval I had taken a moulding of it, and had a duplicate constructed.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He unlocked the gate, and found that a spider had already constructed a large web, tying the door to the lintel, on the supposition that it was never to be opened again.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
They were gone, she hoped, to be happy, however oddly constructed such happiness might seem; as for herself, she was left with as many sensations of comfort, as were, perhaps, ever likely to be hers.
Persuasion - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
contemptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. state of being despised or dishonored; disgrace; disobedience to, or open disrespect of
Gregson and Lestrade had watched the manoeuvres 9 of their amateur companion with considerable curiosity and some contempt.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
There was an expression of contempt on his face, and he bit the side of a great forefinger as he watched the group of faces.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
I knew from the first, that, if I could not do my work as well as any of the rest, I could not hold myself above slight and contempt.
David Copperfield - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
controversyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. contentious speech act; argument
convoyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. accompany for protection, either by sea or land; attend for protection; escort
corruptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. changed from sound to putrid state; spoiled; tainted
Better far that your bones should bleach in this wilderness than that you should prove to be that little speck of decay which in time corrupts the whole fruit.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
counterfeitspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make a copy of, usually with the intent to defraud; forge
All the known incidents of their love were enlarged, distorted, touched up, and modified, till the original reality bore but a slight resemblance to the counterfeit presentation by surrounding tongues.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
craftyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relating to, or characterized by, skill; dexterous; skillful
I recollect well how indignantly my heart beat, as I saw his crafty face, with the appropriately red light of the fire upon it, preparing for something else.
David Copperfield - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
She remembered that both the crafty Jew and the brutal Sikes had confided to her schemes, which had been hidden from all others: in the full confidence that she was trustworthy and beyond the reach of their suspicion.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 44
By Charles Dickens Context
cramspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. pack; force, press, or squeeze into an insufficient space
If you want to cram for anything, I should be troubled to recommend you to a better adviser than Loo Bounderby.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
My plan is one for instilling high knowledge into empty minds without first cramming them with what has to be uncrammed again before true study begins.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
I did, though: I vociferated curses enough to annihilate any fiend in Christendom; and I got a stone and thrust it between his jaws, and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 6
By Emily Bronte Context
crimsonspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. of a rich deep red color inclining to purple; bloody
In and out through the open woodwork was woven a crimson cord, which was secured at each side to the crosspiece below.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
This was worse than before: the youth grew crimson, and clenched his fist, with every appearance of a meditated assault.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
Now that the sun was setting in a welter of crimson behind the hills across the Flint River, the warmth of the April day was ebbing into a faint but balmy chill.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
crisisspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. dangerous situation; crucial or decisive point or situation; a turning point
He was off in one of those hysterical outbursts which come upon a strong nature when some great crisis is over and gone.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If I had known that young man, at the period when my difficulties came to a crisis, all I can say is, that I believe my creditors would have been a great deal better managed than they were.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
For she only had to hold herself back in sexual intercourse, and let him finish and expend himself without herself coming to the crisis: and then she could prolong the connexion and achieve her orgasm and her crisis while he was merely her tool.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
critiquespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. critical review or commentary, especially one dealing with works of art or literature