7th Grade Spelling Words

Organized as 8 lists, each list has pages for vocabulary, online spelling card, and printable worksheet. Vocabulary page not only hosts explanations and examples, but also includes spelling, testing, and other online study tools.
Grade 7: Vocabulary - List 3

crudespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. being in an unrefined or natural state; raw; lacking tact or taste; blunt or offensive
Life in the north Georgia county of Clayton was still new and, according to the standards of Augusta, Savannah and Charleston, a little crude.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
The miners were, in a sense, his own men; but he saw them as objects rather than men, parts of the pit rather than parts of life, crude raw phenomena rather than human beings along with him.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 2
By D H Lawrence Context
custodyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. keeping or guarding; care, watch, inspection, for keeping, preservation, or security
That evening Jefferson Hope was taken into custody, and not being able to find sureties, was detained for some weeks.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
But I remarked that the Old Soldier took him into custody directly, for her partner; and instructed him, as the first preliminary of initiation, to give her all the silver he had in his pocket.
David Copperfield - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
If the villain had stopped here, his case would have been sufficiently awful, but he blackened his guilt by proceeding to take me into custody, with a right of patronage that left all his former criminality far behind.
Great Expectations - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
daintyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. delicately beautiful or charming; exquisite; gratification or pleasure taken in anything
Elsing was younger, a thin frail woman, who had been a beauty, and about her there still clung a faded freshness, a dainty imperious air.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
Mary took him in hand, and when she was done with him he was a man and a brother, without distinction of color, and his saturated hair was neatly brushed, and its short curls wrought into a dainty and symmetrical general effect.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
dampenspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. moisten; lessen in force or effect
dapperspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. neatly dressed; very stylish in dress; lively and alert
The founder of that great emporium proved to be a brisk, crisp little person, very dapper and quick, with a clear head and a ready tongue.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
dataspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. collection of facts, observations, or other information related to a particular question or problem
debatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. discussion; dispute; discussion involving opposing points
Nightly she debated with Melanie the advisability of sending Pork abroad on the horse with some greenbacks to try to buy food.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 28
By Margaret Mitche Context
Certainly the animals did not want Jones back; if the holding of debates on Sunday mornings was liable to bring him back, then the debates must stop.
Animal Farm - Chapter 5
By George Orwell Context
The debate upon it grew so lively, indeed, that at least six more honorable members told six more, during the discussion, that they believed they knew where they were to be found.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
debrisspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
deciduousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. falling off as of leaves; falling off or shed at specific season or stage of growth
Brambles, though churlish when handled, are kindly shelter in early winter, being the latest of the deciduous bushes to lose their leaves.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
decipherspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. convert code into ordinary language; read with difficulty
An immediate interest kindled within me for the unknown Catherine, and I began forthwith to decipher her faded hieroglyphics.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
Holmes and I sat together in silence all the evening, he engaged with a powerful lens deciphering the remains of the original inscription upon a palimpsest, I deep in a recent treatise upon surgery.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
defectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. abandon or turn against; cease or change one's loyalty
Well, I ought to turn that defect to advantage, and by being able to do without what other people require I can spend what such things cost upon anybody else.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
deflectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. turn aside; draw someone's attention away from something
dejectedspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. being in low spirits; depressed
A minute ago, the boy had looked the quiet child, mild, dejected creature that harsh treatment had made him.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 6
By Charles Dickens Context
I was crying all the time, but, except that I was conscious of being cold and dejected, I am sure I never thought why I cried.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
There was a double stream upon the stair, some going up in hope, and some coming back dejected; but we wedged in as well as we could and soon found ourselves in the office.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
depressspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. lower in spirits; press down
He is quieter now than he used to be, if no one provokes him: more sullen and depressed, and less furious.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
In the meantime Eustacia, left alone in her cottage at Alderworth, had become considerably depressed by the posture of affairs.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
It was with a depressed heart that I walked in the starlight for an hour and more, about the courtyard, and about the brewery, and about the ruined garden.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
deprivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. deny a person the possession or use of something; take away
The girl is young, and we would not have her wed grey hairs, neither would we deprive her of all choice.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
His imprudence had made her miserable for a while; but it seemed to have deprived himself of all chance of ever being otherwise.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
It was clear to me, from the strength of the glasses, that the wearer must have been very blind and helpless when deprived of them.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
descendspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. move downward and lower; come from; be connected by a relationship of blood
When at last he descended, it was with triumph in his eyes, but he said nothing to either of us as to the result of his researches.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I leave my estate, with all its advantages and all its disadvantages, to my brother, your father, whence it will, no doubt, descend to you.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The turnkey laughed, and gave us good day, and stood laughing at us over the spikes of the wicket when we descended the steps into the street.
Great Expectations - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
desirespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a strong feeling of wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen
There were at least three others whose desire for vengeance upon me would only be increased by the death of their leader.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Huck started sorrowfully away, and Tom stood looking after him, with a strong desire tugging at his heart to yield his pride and go along too.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 16
By Mark Twain Context
They were always very careful, I observed, to turn my face away from the window, so that I became consumed with the desire to see what was going on behind my back.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
desistspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cease to proceed or act; stop; forbear
Notwithstanding the evidently useless nature of their search, they did not desist until the coming on of night rendered its further prosecution hopeless; and even then, they gave it up with reluctance.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
Faint and sick with the pain of my injured arm, bewildered by the surprise, and yet conscious how easily this threat could be put in execution, I desisted, and tried to ease my arm were it ever so little.
Great Expectations - Chapter 53
By Charles Dickens Context
detainspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. keep back or from; withhold; restrain from proceeding; stay or stop; delay
Clair, then it is obvious that no crime has been committed, and that, therefore, I am illegally detained.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I am looking for Henry every day, and as soon as he comes there will be nothing to detain me at Mansfield.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 29
By Jane Austen Context
But, I had already considered that such a course, by detaining us there, or binding us to come back, might be fatal to Provis.
Great Expectations - Chapter 53
By Charles Dickens Context
devoidspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. completely lacking; barren or empty
Evidently he had overheard the whole conversation, for he grinned up at her as maliciously as a tomcat, and again his eyes went over her, in a gaze totally devoid of the deference she was accustomed to.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
devourspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. consume; eat greedily; destroy completely
So next morning Mick was more uneasy than ever; restless, devoured, with his hands restless in his trousers pockets.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 5
By D H Lawrence Context
These hungry men could devour the whole shoat at one meal and, if they knew of the live hogs, they could commandeer them for the army.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 28
By Margaret Mitche Context
He walked up to the sideboard, and tearing a piece from the loaf he devoured it voraciously, washing it down with a long draught of water.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
dexterityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. right-handedness; readiness and grace in physical activity; skill and ease in using the hands; expertness in manual acts
But, he was on his feet directly, and after sponging himself with a great show of dexterity began squaring again.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
At this signal, the little elephant, with a dexterity that was next to marvellous in so small an animal, whisked the chair round with Mr.
David Copperfield - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
dictatorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one who dictates; one who prescribes rules and maxims authoritatively for the direction of others.
dischargespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. relieve of a burden or of contents; unload; pour forth or release; complete or carry out; give off
For some time there was no noise but the grating sound of the spades discharging their freight of mould and gravel.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 9
By Mark Twain Context
Nothing has, as yet, turned up; and it may not surprise you, my dear Master Copperfield, so much as it would a stranger, to know that we are at present waiting for a remittance from London, to discharge our pecuniary obligations at this hotel.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
disclosespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. unclose; open; remove a cover or envelope from; lay open or expose to view
Still in the same moment, I saw that the face disclosed, was the face of the other convict of long ago.
Great Expectations - Chapter 54
By Charles Dickens Context
I am not in an official position, and there is no reason, so long as the ends of justice are served, why I should disclose all that I know.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
A child was weeding one of the little beds; as he stopped, he raised his pale face and disclosed the features of one of his former companions.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
disguisespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. dress or exterior put on for purposes of concealment or of deception
Though Eustacia could not eat without uncovering her face she could drink easily enough beneath her disguise.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
So were the tinted spectacles and the curious voice, which both hinted at a disguise, as did the bushy whiskers.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
And Connie pulled on the disguise, then the long motoring coat, and she sat down, a goggling inhuman, unrecognizable creature.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 16
By D H Lawrence Context
dismalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. causing gloom or depression; dreary; somber; melancholy
Tom partly uncovered a dismal caricature of a house with two gable ends to it and a corkscrew of smoke issuing from the chimney.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
At this dismal intelligence, I twisted the only button on my waistcoat round and round, and looked in great depression at the fire.
Great Expectations - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
displacespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. move or shift from the usual place or position, especially to force to leave a homeland
The shadows were falling thicker now, the last greenish tinge had left the sky and a slight chill was displacing the balminess of spring.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 2
By Margaret Mitche Context
The stones of which the strongest London buildings are made are not more real, or more impossible to be displaced by your hands, than your presence and influence have been to me, there and everywhere, and will be.
Great Expectations - Chapter 44
By Charles Dickens Context
The great Frederick making war on the beautiful Archduchess, Napoleon refusing terms to the beautiful Queen of Prussia, were not more dead to difference of sex than the reddleman was, in his peculiar way, in planning the displacement of Eustacia.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
disproportionatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. unequal; unbalanced; too much or too little in relation to something else
Again her large bonnet (very disproportionate to the figure) went backwards and forwards, in her swaying of her little body to and fro; while a most gigantic bonnet rocked, in unison with it, upon the wall.
David Copperfield - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
disruptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. upset; throw into confusion or disorder
The mails were still disrupted, no one knew where the Confederates were or what the Yankees were up to.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 20
By Margaret Mitche Context
disseminatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. distribute; spread; scatter like seeds
distinctspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. recognizably different in nature from something else of a similar type; separate
I could not find anything in the nature of a distinct impression, but the grass was trodden down, and someone had undoubtedly passed.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Though I quite understood that the purpose of this announcement was to get rid of me, I have no distinct remembrance whether it pleased or frightened me.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
Grimwig lifted up his head, and converting one of the hind legs of his chair into a pivot, described three distinct circles with the assistance of his stick and the table; sitting in it all the time.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
dotingspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. weak-minded; foolishly loving and indulgent
No one except the doting father could see anything beautiful about her, but the neighbors were charitable enough to say that all ugly babies turned out pretty, eventually.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 42
By Margaret Mitche Context
dreadfulspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. very unpleasant; distasteful or shocking
He spun round with a scream and fell upon his back, his hideous red face turning suddenly to a dreadful mottled pallor.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He was in dreadful earnest and made me swear, with my hands on the Testament, that whatever happened I would always be true to him.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Hines he hurt my wrist dreadful pulling and tugging so, and I reckon he clean forgot I was in the world, he was so excited and panting.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 29
By Mark Twain Context
dualspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. expressing, or consisting of, the number two; belonging to two
In his singular character the dual nature alternately asserted itself, and his extreme exactness and astuteness represented, as I have often thought, the reaction against the poetic and contemplative mood which occasionally predominated in him.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
easespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. satisfaction; pleasure; entertainment; freedom from care
Handle them never so lightly, and they fell to pieces with such ease that you might suspect them of having been flawed before.
Hard Times - Chapter 15
By Charles Dickens Context
I never could have believed it without experience, but as Joe and Biddy became more at their cheerful ease again, I became quite gloomy.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
He concealed his fears from his daughter, however, and affected to make light of the whole matter, though she, with the keen eye of love, saw plainly that he was ill at ease.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
echelonspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. level or rank in an organization, profession, or society; formation of troops, ships
eclipsespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. darken; exceed in importance; outweigh
Clym, the eclipsed moonlight shines upon your face with a strange foreign colour, and shows its shape as if it were cut out in gold.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
economicalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. thrifty; saving; using the minimum of time or resources necessary for effectiveness
edictspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. decree ,especially issued by a sovereign; official command
Force had been piled on top of force and military edicts in increasing numbers had rendered the civil authority more and more impotent.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 47
By Margaret Mitche Context
effacespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. rub or wipe out; make indistinct as if by rubbing
He had made the hut tidy, put the little table and chair near the fireplace, left a little pile of kindling and small logs, and put the tools and traps away as far as possible, effacing himself.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 10
By D H Lawrence Context
eludespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. avoid cleverly; escape perception of
But if she DID, the letter was written and sent away with a privacy which eluded all her watchfulness to ascertain the fact.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 27
By Jane Austen Context
She sighed as she carefully tied the ribbon about the packet, wondering for the thousandth time just what it was in Ashley that eluded her understanding.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 11
By Margaret Mitche Context
As the man made no answer when I asked him what he did there, but eluded my touch in silence, I ran to the Lodge and urged the watchman to come quickly; telling him of the incident on the way back.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
embarkspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. commence; go on board a boat or airplane; begin a journey
There was no boat off the point, nor any boat drawn up anywhere near it, nor were there any signs of the men having embarked there.
Great Expectations - Chapter 54
By Charles Dickens Context
As a matter of fact, burglars who have done a good stroke of business are, as a rule, only too glad to enjoy the proceeds in peace and quiet without embarking on another perilous undertaking.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
emblemspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. symbol; sign; distinctive badge, design, or device
It was a warm June morning, and the Latter Day Saints were as busy as the bees whose hive they have chosen for their emblem.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Well, this dead man had some Catholic emblem round his neck, and that, along with his colour, made me think he was from the South.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
They ought to learn to be naked and handsome, and to sing in a mass and dance the old group dances, and carve the stools they sit on, and embroider their own emblems.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 19
By D H Lawrence Context
emergespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. come into prominence; spring up; appear
In a very short time a decrepit figure had emerged from the opium den, and I was walking down the street with Sherlock Holmes.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
When he did emerge, it was in a ceremonial manner, with an escort of six dogs who closely surrounded him and growled if anyone came too near.
Animal Farm - Chapter 7
By George Orwell Context
I did detect a figure creeping along the inner fence of the park; but it was not my young mistress: on its emerging into the light, I recognised one of the grooms.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 24
By Emily Bronte Context
employspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. engage the services of; put to work; apply
For a day or two we were busily employed in unpacking and laying out our property to the best advantage.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
My dear Dora, unless we learn to do our duty to those whom we employ, they will never learn to do their duty to us.
David Copperfield - Chapter 48
By Charles Dickens Context
And I even attempted, more than once, for my own private satisfaction, to employ his methods in their solution, though with indifferent success.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
enchantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. charm by sorcery; get control of by magical words and rites
The boys were enchanted, as she had intended them to be, and they hastened to apologize for boring her.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
I repair to the enchanted house, where there are lights, chattering, music, flowers, officers (I am sorry to see), and the eldest Miss Larkins, a blaze of beauty.
David Copperfield - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
endangerspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. threaten; jeopardize; do something that may damage it or destroy it
That they should be man and wife in good time, if the happiness of neither were endangered thereby, was the fancy in question.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
At present I am ready to promise that the instant that I can communicate with you without endangering my own combinations, I shall do so.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The wind being as fierce as ever, we did not care to endanger the light in the lantern by rekindling the extinguished lamps on the staircase, but we examined the staircase from the bottom to the top and found no one there.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
endorsespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. acknowledge by signing a bill, draft, or other instrument; approve; support
endowspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. grant; award; give qualities or abilities to
Palmer, on the contrary, who was strongly endowed by nature with a turn for being uniformly civil and happy, was hardly seated before her admiration of the parlour and every thing in it burst forth.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
engrossspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. occupy exclusively; absorb; acquire most or all of; write or print the final draft of; make large or larger
Tom was engrossed by the concerns of his theatre, and saw nothing that did not immediately relate to it.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
For the past year, she had been so engrossed in her own woes, so bored by any mention of war, she did not know that from the minute the fighting first began, Atlanta had been transformed.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
engulfspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. absorb or swallow up as in a gulf; flow over or cover completely
As the high watery walls came rolling in, and, at their highest, tumbled into surf, they looked as if the least would engulf the town.
David Copperfield - Chapter 55
By Charles Dickens Context