High School Spelling Words

Spelling words for grade 9, 10, 11, and 12; 8 lists for each grade; vocabulary, online spelling exercise, thousands of printable quizzes and cards.
Grade 9: Word List - List 4

extension
read  n. supplement; act of extending or the condition of being extended
extraordinary
read  a. exceptional; remarkable; beyond what is ordinary or usual
His hands were invariably blotted with ink and stained with chemicals, yet he was possessed of extraordinary delicacy of touch, as I frequently had occasion to observe when I watched him manipulating his fragile philosophical instruments.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
With a large allowance for difference of tastes, and with all submission to the patricians of Coketown, this seemed so extraordinary a source of interest to take so much trouble about, that it perplexed him.
Hard Times - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
It cannot be expected that this system of farming would produce any very extraordinary or luxuriant crop.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
fallacy
read  n. deceptive or false appearance; false notion; deception
financial
read  a. monetary; pertaining or relating to money matters
forfeit
read  v. lose or be deprived of property or a right or privilege as a penalty for wrongdoing
What Edward had done to forfeit the right of eldest son, might have puzzled many people to find out; and what Robert had done to succeed to it, might have puzzled them still more.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 50
By Jane Austen Context
fragile
read  a. easy to destroy, delicate, not strong
He approached once more, and made as if he would seize the fragile being; but, shrinking back, Linton clung to his cousin, and implored her to accompany him, with a frantic importunity that admitted no denial.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 27
By Emily Bronte Context
gasoline
read  n. petrol; flammable liquid consisting of a mixture of refined petroleum hydrocarbons
grateful
read  a. thankful; appreciative of benefits received
As it turns out your presence was unnecessary, and I would have brought the case to this successful issue without you, but, none the less, I am grateful.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
They gained steadily on it, and at last, breast to breast, they burst through the open door and fell grateful and exhausted in the sheltering shadows beyond.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 10
By Mark Twain Context
I looked as grateful as any boy possibly could, who was wholly uninformed why he ought to assume that expression.
Great Expectations - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
gymnasium
read  n. place or building where athletic exercises are performed; a school for gymnastics
hindrance
read  n. something that holds back or causes problems with something else; obstacle
Willoughby, an equally striking opposition of character was no hindrance to the regard of Colonel Brandon.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
hygiene
read  n. cleanliness; sanitation
hypocrisy
read  n. practice of professing beliefs, feelings, or virtues that one does not hold; falseness; expression of agreement that is not supported by real conviction
Though I had long known that his servility was false, and all his pretences knavish and hollow, I had had no adequate conception of the extent of his hypocrisy, until I now saw him with his mask off.
David Copperfield - Chapter 52
By Charles Dickens Context
illustrate
read  v. represent; demonstrate; depict; clarify, as by use of examples or comparisons
With due discretion the incident itself may, however, be described, since it serves to illustrate some of those qualities for which my friend was remarkable.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
imitation
read  n. emulation; copying the actions of someone else
The board, in imitation of so wise and salutary an example, took counsel together on the expediency of shipping off Oliver Twist, in some small trading vessel bound to a good unhealthy port.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
To the girls, who could not listen to their cousin, and who had nothing to do but to wish for an instrument, and examine their own indifferent imitations of china on the mantelpiece, the interval of waiting appeared very long.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 16
By Jane Austen Context
immense
read  a. enormous; boundless; so great as to be beyond measurement
I well remember though, how the distant idea of the holidays, after seeming for an immense time to be a stationary speck, began to come towards us, and to grow and grow.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
From her breast flowed the answering, immense yearning over him; she must give him anything, anything.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 3
By D H Lawrence Context
He had become quite excited and his strange eyes began to shine like stars and looked more immense than ever.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 13
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
inability
read  n. lack of ability, especially mental ability, to do something
It was sad to see him struggling between his desire to represent it to me as a matter of choice on his part, and his inability to conceal that it was forced upon him.
David Copperfield - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
After completely exhausting herself, she stopped to take breath: and, as if suddenly recollecting herself, and deploring her inability to do something she was bent upon, wrung her hands, and burst into tears.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
incidentally
read  ad. by chance; accidentally
My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
In pursuance of my intention of referring to my own fictions only when their course should incidentally connect itself with the progress of my story, I do not enter on the aspirations, the delights, anxieties, and triumphs of my art.
David Copperfield - Chapter 61
By Charles Dickens Context
indispensable
read  a. essential; requisite; impossible to be omitted or remitted
There was no indispensable necessity for my communicating with Joe by letter, inasmuch as he sat beside me and we were alone.
Great Expectations - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
Collins met for breakfast a few minutes before the others appeared; and he took the opportunity of paying the parting civilities which he deemed indispensably necessary.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 38
By Jane Austen Context
influential
read  a. important; powerful; having or exercising influence or power
You have found in him an influential and kind friend, who will be kinder yet, I venture to predict, if you deserve it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
inquiry
read  n. investigation; search for knowledge
Briefly, Watson, I am in the midst of a very remarkable inquiry, and I have hoped to find a clue in the incoherent ramblings of these sots, as I have done before now.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I gave her a hug to take away the turn, or to give her another turn in the right direction, and then stood before her, looking at her in anxious inquiry.
David Copperfield - Chapter 3
By Charles Dickens Context
The boy who addressed this inquiry to the young wayfarer, was about his own age: but one of the queerest looking boys that Oliver had even seen.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
institute
read  n. advance or set forth in court; association organized to promote art or science or education
intellect
read  n. ability to learn and reason; ability to think abstractly or profoundly
If he should turn to and beat her, he may possibly get the strength on his side; if it should be a question of intellect, he certainly will not.
Great Expectations - Chapter 48
By Charles Dickens Context
interference
read  n. obstruction; prevention; act or an instance of hindering, obstructing, or impeding
It does not often happen that the interference of friends will persuade a young man of independent fortune to think no more of a girl whom he was violently in love with only a few days before.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 25
By Jane Austen Context
interpretation
read  n. explanation; performer's distinctive personal version of a song, dance, piece of music
However novel and peculiar this testimony of attachment, I did not doubt the accuracy of the interpretation.
Great Expectations - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
And this once admitted, an absolutely dark interpretation of her act towards his mother was no longer forced upon him.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
interval
read  n. pause; break; space between two objects, points, or units
It was claimed that same evening, and returned; but in the interval I had taken a moulding of it, and had a duplicate constructed.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
His whole life appears to be spent in an alternation between savage fits of passion and gloomy intervals of sulking.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The soldiers were in front of us, extending into a pretty wide line with an interval between man and man.
Great Expectations - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
irrelevant
read  a. not applicable; unrelated; having no connection with