High School Spelling Words

Spelling words for grade 9, 10, 11, and 12; 8 lists for each grade; vocabulary, online spelling exercise, thousands of printable quizzes and cards.
Grade 9: Word List - List 7

priority
read  n. preceding in time, importance, or urgency
procedure
read  n. act or manner of moving forward; act performed; steps taken in an action
procession
read  n. act of proceeding, moving on, advancing, or issuing; regular, orderly, or ceremonious progress; continuous course
WE slept most all day, and started out at night, a little ways behind a monstrous long raft that was as long going by as a procession.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 16
By Mark Twain Context
Boxer and Clover pulled the wagon which served as a hearse, and Napoleon himself walked at the head of the procession.
Animal Farm - Chapter 8
By George Orwell Context
Hubble, who were surpassingly conceited and vainglorious in being members of so distinguished a procession.
Great Expectations - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
prominent
read  a. conspicuous; immediately noticeable; sticking out; widely known
Abraham in red going to sacrifice Isaac in blue, and Daniel in yellow cast into a den of green lions, were the most prominent of these.
David Copperfield - Chapter 3
By Charles Dickens Context
The most prominent object was a long table with a tablecloth spread on it, as if a feast had been in preparation when the house and the clocks all stopped together.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
Clifford looked at Connie, with his pale, slightly prominent blue eyes, in which a certain vagueness was coming.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 5
By D H Lawrence Context
proposition
read  n. plan suggested for acceptance; a matter to be dealt with; subject for discussion or analysis
It seems to me, at this distance of time, as if it were the next day when Peggotty broached the striking and adventurous proposition I am about to mention; but it was probably about two months afterwards.
David Copperfield - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
Her next proposition, of shewing the house to such of them as had not been there before, was more acceptable, for Miss Bertram was pleased to have its size displayed, and all were glad to be doing something.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 9
By Jane Austen Context
prosperous
read  a. successful; thriving; having or characterized by financial success or good fortune
Among those who are at all his equals in consequence, he is a very different man from what he is to the less prosperous.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 16
By Jane Austen Context
She could not consider her partiality for Edward in so prosperous a state as Marianne had believed it.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 4
By Jane Austen Context
psychology
read  n. science that deals with mental processes and behavior
publicity
read  n. state of being public; information to attract public notice
questionnaire
read  n. form containing a set of questions; submitted to people to gain statistical information
readily
read  ad. easily; quickly; in a prompt, timely manner; promptly
I shall now add a little milk to make the mixture palatable, and on presenting it to the dog we find that he laps it up readily enough.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
You knew that this man Horner, the plumber, had been concerned in some such matter before, and that suspicion would rest the more readily upon him.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
A regard for the requester would often make one readily yield to a request, without waiting for arguments to reason one into it.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
reference
read  n. act of referring or consulting; remark that calls attention to something or someone
I have determined, therefore, to call upon you and to consult you in reference to the very painful event which has occurred in connection with my wedding.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
A reference to the passenger list showed that Miss Fraser, of Adelaide, with her maid had made the voyage in her.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Wopsle referred to me, he considered it a necessary part of such reference to rumple my hair and poke it into my eyes.
Great Expectations - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
register
read  v. give outward signs of; express; record in writing; enroll as a student
rehearsal
read  n. act of rehearsing; exercise or practice to prepare for a public performance
Maria, she also thought, acted well, too well; and after the first rehearsal or two, Fanny began to be their only audience; and sometimes as prompter, sometimes as spectator, was often very useful.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
religious
read  a. of religion; concerned with religion; having or showing belief in and reverence for God or a deity
No matter what the subject might be, a brainracking effort was made to squirm it into some aspect or other that the moral and religious mind could contemplate with edification.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 21
By Mark Twain Context
The ownership of property has now become a religious question: as it has been since Jesus and St Francis.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 13
By D H Lawrence Context
representative
read  n. one that represents anything; that which exhibits a likeness or similitude; agent
When he was sober he used to be fond of playing backgammon and draughts with me, and he would make me his representative both with the servants and with the tradespeople, so that by the time that I was sixteen I was quite master of the house.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
resistance
read  n. action of opposing something that you disapprove or disagree with
His face and hands were terribly mangled by his passage through the glass, but loss of blood had no effect in diminishing his resistance.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Only when I pressed the cold muzzle of the revolver to his temple did he at last understand that resistance was vain.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Left alone with her mother, Louisa saw her lying with an awful lull upon her face, like one who was floating away upon some great water, all resistance over, content to be carried down the stream.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
resolution
read  n. determination; resolving to do something; formal statement of a decision
I had a catching of the breath, and my skin went cold at the words, which were slowly uttered in a tone of concentrated resolution.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The basin was refilled, and this time he stood over it a little while, gathering resolution; took in a big breath and began.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
Elizabeth would wonder, and probably would blame her; and though her resolution was not to be shaken, her feelings must be hurt by such a disapprobation.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
responsibility
read  n. duties; obligation; state of being responsible, accountable, or answerable
The Duke is greatly agitated, and, as to me, you have seen yourselves the state of nervous prostration to which the suspense and the responsibility have reduced me.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I have no doubt she has connived at your desertion of your duties and responsibilities, so do not expect me to show pleasure in seeing her.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 19
By D H Lawrence Context
I felt no inclination to tarry the event; and, resolving to seek medical aid on my own responsibility, I quitted the chamber.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 12
By Emily Bronte Context
ridiculous
read  a. completely lacking of wisdom or good sense
The human beings could not contain their rage when they heard this song, though they pretended to think it merely ridiculous.
Animal Farm - Chapter 4
By George Orwell Context
In fact everything was a little ridiculous, or very ridiculous: certainly everything connected with authority, whether it were in the army or the government or the universities, was ridiculous to a degree.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 3
By Jane Austen Context
security
read  n. freedom from risk or danger; safety
One of our most lucrative means of laying out money is in the shape of loans, where the security is unimpeachable.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Betsey funded her property for some time, and then, by the advice of her man of business, laid it out on landed security.
David Copperfield - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
senator
read  n. a member of a senate; a member of the king's council; a king's councilor
sensibility
read  n. ability to feel or perceive; keen intellectual perception
For the first time, since their renewed acquaintance, she felt that she was betraying the least sensibility of the two.
Persuasion - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
They read, they talked, they sang together; his musical talents were considerable; and he read with all the sensibility and spirit which Edward had unfortunately wanted.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
sheer
read  a. very thin or transparent; very steep; absolute or pure
In your picturesque account of the matter, which I read with great interest some months later, you assert that the wall was sheer.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
In a school carried on by sheer cruelty, whether it is presided over by a dunce or not, there is not likely to be much learnt.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
She lays close to the Endymion, between her and the Cleopatra, just to the eastward of the sheer hulk.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 38
By Jane Austen Context
sheriff
read  n. chief officer of a shire or county, to whom is entrusted the execution of the laws
There was another pause, and then the judge arrived and the sheriff proclaimed the opening of the court.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 23
By Mark Twain Context
Brownlow and Oliver appeared at the wicket, and presented an order of admission to the prisoner, signed by one of the sheriffs.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 52
By Charles Dickens Context
significance
read  n. message that is intended or expressed or signified; meaning
Her eye was arrested by what was a familiar sight enough, though it broke upon her now with a new significance.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
simile
read  n. comparison of one thing with another, in English generally using like or as
His celebrated passages are quoted by everybody; they are in half the books we open, and we all talk Shakespeare, use his similes, and describe with his descriptions; but this is totally distinct from giving his sense as you gave it.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 34
By Jane Austen Context