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Quote of TRUTH from Herman Melville of Mo from Dick

Thinks I, Queequeg, under the circumstances, this is a very civilized overture; but, the truth is, these savages have an innate sense of delicacy, say what you will; it is marvellous how essentially polite they are.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane Reading
The sailors mark him; more and more certain grow their suspicions of him, and at last, fully to test the truth, by referring the whole matter to high Heaven, they fall to casting lots, to see for whose cause this great tempest was upon them.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 9. The Sermon Reading
Delight is to him, who gives no quarter in the truth, and kills, burns, and destroys all sin though he pluck it out from under the robes of Senators and Judges.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 9. The Sermon Reading
So that, in real truth, the mates and harpooneers of the Pequod might more properly be said to have lived out of the cabin than in it.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 34. The Cabin-Table Reading
Here are three instances, then, which I personally know the truth of; but I have heard of many other instances from persons whose veracity in the matter there is no good ground to impeach.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 45. The Affidavit Reading
For this is one of those disheartening instances where truth requires full as much bolstering as error.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 45. The Affidavit Reading
In truth, this gentleman is a luxurious Ottoman, swimming about over the watery world, surroundingly accompanied by all the solaces and endearments of the harem.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 88. Schools and Schoolmasters Reading
In truth, it turned out to be one of those problematical whales that seem to dry up and die with a sort of prodigious dyspepsia, or indigestion; leaving their defunct bodies almost entirely bankrupt of anything like oil.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 91. The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud Reading
The truth is, that living or dead, if but decently treated, whales as a species are by no means creatures of ill odor; nor can whalemen be recognised, as the people of the middle ages affected to detect a Jew in the company, by the nose.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 92. Ambergris Reading
In fact, I was so afraid of him that I was not game enough just then to address him, and demand a satisfactory answer concerning what seemed inexplicable in him.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn Reading
In the first place, it may be deemed almost superfluous to establish the fact, that among people at large, the business of whaling is not accounted on a level with what are called the liberal professions.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 24. The Advocate Reading
First: The uncertain, unsettled condition of this science of Cetology is in the very vestibule attested by the fact, that in some quarters it still remains a moot point whether a whale be a fish.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 32. Cetology Reading
But they precisely agree in all their grand features; nor has there yet been presented a single determinate fact upon which to ground a radical distinction.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 32. Cetology Reading
Yet without power to kill, or change, or shun the fact; he likewise knew that to mankind he did long dissemble; in some sort, did still.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick Reading
In fact, as the great Hunter says, the mere skeleton of the whale bears the same relation to the fully invested and padded animal as the insect does to the chrysalis that so roundingly envelopes it.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 55. Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales Reading
And by those negations, considered along with the affirmative fact of his prodigious bulk and power, you can best form to yourself the truest, though not the most exhilarating conception of what the most exalted potency is.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 80. The Nut Reading
It is only indispensable with an inveterate running whale; its grand fact and feature is the wonderful distance to which the long lance is accurately darted from a violently rocking, jerking boat, under extreme headway.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 84. Pitchpoling Reading
The anatomical fact of this labyrinth is indisputable; and that the supposition founded upon it is reasonable and true, seems the more cogent to me, when I consider the otherwise inexplicable obstinacy of that leviathan in HAVING HIS SPOUTINGS OUT, as the fishermen phrase it.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 85. The Fountain Reading
A significant illustration of the fact, again and again repeated in this book, that the skeleton of the whale furnishes but little clue to the shape of his fully invested body.
Herman Melville
Moby Dick, CHAPTER 104. The Fossil Whale Reading
When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth.
A. Conan Doyle
The Hound of the Baskervilles, Chapter 1. Mr. Sherlock Holmes Reading